Conservative Manifesto

April 13, 2010

You can read it here

In short the Conservatives plan:

· to build a new economic model

· to build the Big Society

· to build a political system where people have more power and control over their lives.

Compare it with Labour’s manifesto and its:

· Big State -v-Big Society

· Government meddling-v- Trusting people

· Big debt and Borrowing -v-Prudence and New Economics.


Nick Griffin & Question Time

October 23, 2009

I was unfortunately very disappointed with last nights Question Time and especially the way David Dimbleby chaired the discussion. Everyone knows that the BNP is a racist and vile party. Nick Griffin’s views are equally well known especially those relating to race, immigration and Islam i.e BNP topics. Yet more than three quarters of the show was devoted to these issues with quotes of what Griffin has stated in the past being thrown at him from all sides. Griffin despite being hated by almost all in the audience must have been delighted to have had the chance to say that immigration had been and was still out of control and that Islam was incompatible with western democracy. His message wasn’t to the studio audience but to those living in run down council estates and other deprived areas where such messages are so well received. He had several more open goals and had he not been so nervous and overwhelmed he could have made more of this opportunity to put forward his ideology and get his message across.

The panel discussions should have focused more on current concerns of the population on matters such as the economy, housing, education etc which would have exposed the shallowness of the BNP ideology. The BNP does well when it is criticizing others, highlighting or exposing populist concerns and being entirely negative and blaming a particular group for all society’s ills. Yet it doesn’t do well or win when it has to put forward policies to tackle these concerns or explain them in any detail.

Griffin would have looked even more out of his depth on discussions on education or crime or managing the economy out of the recession. In the end the BBC got its ratings and we didn’t learn anymore than we already knew about the BNP and Nick Griffin, who could have made much more of the oppurtunity afforded to him by the BBC to get his message out but failed to do so.


The End is Nigh

June 3, 2009

Tomorrow is polling day and if Labour is given not only a bloody nose but as expected a knockout blow it seems inevitable that Gordon Brown will quit as PM. Even if the election results aren’t as bad as expected, I believe that by next week Gordon Brown will face a leadership challenge. Brown has no leadership qualities, he reacts to events far too late and constantly dithers and isn’t up to the job of PM – he plotted and connived to become PM and has ruled by fear ever since and has never commanded or deserved any respect.

Through his incompetence he has taken the Labour Party to the brink of electoral annihilation which his MP’s have remarkably only realised now and it is therefore an absolute certainty that MP’s desperate to hold onto their seats at the next election will move to have him ousted. The fear factor has gone and with Cabinet member resignations being announced such as Hazel Blears this morning before the expected reshuffle, so has collective responsibility. With each day the case for a general election grows stronger as Brown’s government grinds to a halt with no policies being implemented, introduced or even being thought of. The Government is in limbo and the PM and his Cabinet unable to effect any change.

Today the Guardian has a damning editorial on the PM calling him to go. It says

The tragedy for Mr Brown and his party is that his chance to change it has gone. Although he still purports to be a radical, he has adopted the caution of an establishment man. He cannot lead a revolution against his own way of doing government, and yet a revolution is necessary. Grandstanding on his claims to good intentions, the prime minister demands the right to carry on, even as the cabinet implodes around him. The home secretary, the chancellor, and perhaps even the foreign secretary may go, and Labour faces its worst defeat in its history on Thursday, but the prime minister does not recognise his direct responsibility for the mayhem.

The truth is that there is no vision from him, no plan, no argument for the future and no support. The public see it. His party sees it. The cabinet must see it too, although they are not yet bold enough to say so. The prime minister demands loyalty, but that has become too much to ask of a party, and a country, that was never given the chance to vote for him…He is not obviously able to lead. He blames others for failures and allows them insufficient credit for successes, as the current dismembering of Alistair Darling’s reputation shows.

The next seven days will be crucial to Britain’s political future. Jacqui Smith’s pre-emptive resignation yesterday was the start of a reshuffle that Mr Brown may be imagining will defend himself from terrible election results. He is heading for the bunker. If Labour holds off now, at perhaps the last moment when a change of leader might be possible, it had better reconcile itself to sticking with its leader to the bitter end. … During the next few days it will become apparent whether Mr Brown still commands sufficient support among his parliamentary colleagues to carry on. If he suspects not, he would win much respect by announcing that he will be standing down, and let his party choose someone who can use its remaining time in power to reform parliament and then fight the election with credibility.

The case for a new leader has been made stronger by the expenses crisis. Labour needs to enter the next election having reformed parliament. But Mr Brown will never do it. The prime minister was absent from the start of the debate and cautious now he has joined it. His instinct is usually to hesitate, and to establish reviews and commissions

And it concludes with

Labour has a year left before an election; its current leader would waste it. It is time to cut him loose

Cut him loose, call an election and give the public the chance to vote out a tired, stale and useless Labour Government.


Baby P’s Mother Jailed

May 22, 2009

Baby Peter’s mother has been jailed indefinitely and told that she will serve at least five years in jail. The Judge described her as ‘manipulative and self-centred’ with  ‘a calculating side as well as a temper. He added that ‘I reject the suggestion that you were blind to what was happening in that house or that you were naive…Your conduct over the months prevented Peter from being seen by social services. You actively deceived the authorities.’

Her partner was jailed for life and told that he would serve at least ten years for abusing Baby P and the rape of a two-year-old girl.

The sentences have come on the same day as the findings of the second serious case review which concluded that the abuse and death ‘could and should have been prevented’ and that Baby P ‘deserved better from the services that were there to protect him.’ And that ‘the panel deeply regrets the responses of the services were not sufficiently effective in protecting him.’

As I have mentioned previously, the death of Baby P was wholly avoidable. All vulnerable children have to be protected and the systems in place to do so have to be comprehensive. Lets hope we don’t have to discuss any similar cases in the future


May Election Broadcast

May 6, 2009

Karen Matthews Sentenced

January 23, 2009

Karen Mathews and Michael Donovan have been sentenced to eight years in prison after being found guilty of kidnap, the false imprisonment of Shannon Matthews and perverting the course of justice. That should give them both plenty of time to reflect on their outrageously shocking behaviour , especially Karen who has left her daughter traumatised according to the Judge and in need of psychotherapy.


Broken Britain by IDS

December 6, 2008

Following on from my post yesterday on Karen Matthews dysfunctional family life, read this excellent piece on the problems relating to Broken Britain by Iain Duncan Smith. IDS is doing excellent work on identifying why there is social and family breakdown in many areas of Britain through the Centre For Social Justice and how these should be rectified.