The End is Nigh

June 3, 2009

Tomorrow is polling day and if Labour is given not only a bloody nose but as expected a knockout blow it seems inevitable that Gordon Brown will quit as PM. Even if the election results aren’t as bad as expected, I believe that by next week Gordon Brown will face a leadership challenge. Brown has no leadership qualities, he reacts to events far too late and constantly dithers and isn’t up to the job of PM – he plotted and connived to become PM and has ruled by fear ever since and has never commanded or deserved any respect.

Through his incompetence he has taken the Labour Party to the brink of electoral annihilation which his MP’s have remarkably only realised now and it is therefore an absolute certainty that MP’s desperate to hold onto their seats at the next election will move to have him ousted. The fear factor has gone and with Cabinet member resignations being announced such as Hazel Blears this morning before the expected reshuffle, so has collective responsibility. With each day the case for a general election grows stronger as Brown’s government grinds to a halt with no policies being implemented, introduced or even being thought of. The Government is in limbo and the PM and his Cabinet unable to effect any change.

Today the Guardian has a damning editorial on the PM calling him to go. It says

The tragedy for Mr Brown and his party is that his chance to change it has gone. Although he still purports to be a radical, he has adopted the caution of an establishment man. He cannot lead a revolution against his own way of doing government, and yet a revolution is necessary. Grandstanding on his claims to good intentions, the prime minister demands the right to carry on, even as the cabinet implodes around him. The home secretary, the chancellor, and perhaps even the foreign secretary may go, and Labour faces its worst defeat in its history on Thursday, but the prime minister does not recognise his direct responsibility for the mayhem.

The truth is that there is no vision from him, no plan, no argument for the future and no support. The public see it. His party sees it. The cabinet must see it too, although they are not yet bold enough to say so. The prime minister demands loyalty, but that has become too much to ask of a party, and a country, that was never given the chance to vote for him…He is not obviously able to lead. He blames others for failures and allows them insufficient credit for successes, as the current dismembering of Alistair Darling’s reputation shows.

The next seven days will be crucial to Britain’s political future. Jacqui Smith’s pre-emptive resignation yesterday was the start of a reshuffle that Mr Brown may be imagining will defend himself from terrible election results. He is heading for the bunker. If Labour holds off now, at perhaps the last moment when a change of leader might be possible, it had better reconcile itself to sticking with its leader to the bitter end. … During the next few days it will become apparent whether Mr Brown still commands sufficient support among his parliamentary colleagues to carry on. If he suspects not, he would win much respect by announcing that he will be standing down, and let his party choose someone who can use its remaining time in power to reform parliament and then fight the election with credibility.

The case for a new leader has been made stronger by the expenses crisis. Labour needs to enter the next election having reformed parliament. But Mr Brown will never do it. The prime minister was absent from the start of the debate and cautious now he has joined it. His instinct is usually to hesitate, and to establish reviews and commissions

And it concludes with

Labour has a year left before an election; its current leader would waste it. It is time to cut him loose

Cut him loose, call an election and give the public the chance to vote out a tired, stale and useless Labour Government.


The G20 Talkathon

April 1, 2009

President Obama has strolled into Downing Street and Gordon Brown has been grinning as best he can in the hope that this shot will be splashed all over the papers tomorrow. Gordon Brown is going against all his natural instincts but he’s managed to force the smile out!!

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, right, and US President Barack Obama leaves 10 Downing Street in London

Now that is out of the way, we must hope that an agreement is reached among the G20 that actually leads to affirmative action to deal with the world economy. I am highly sceptical that any deal will be reached that will have a quick and positive impact on the world economy not least for the reason that this meeting has come at least 6 months too late and all the major western nations are gripped by recession. But better late than never and if all the leaders sign up to anti-protectionists measures (such as dismissing British jobs for British workers type nonsense) that will be at least something positive coming out of what appears to be a very expensive international talking shop.


No More Fiscal Stimulus?

March 24, 2009

‘Given how big [UK fiscal] deficits are, I think it would be sensible to be cautious about going further in using discretionary measures to expand the size of those deficits.

The level of the fiscal position in the UK is not one that would say: ‘Well, why don’t we just engage in another significant round of fiscal expansion?’

Mervyn King giving evidence to the Treasury Select Committee has cast serious doubts on Gordon Brown’s preferred remedy for the UK economy. Brown might as well cancel the G20 summit and save the taxpayers millions earmarked for the policing of this event!

Hat tip: Coffee House, Ben Brogan


Timid Apology?

March 17, 2009

Does taking ‘full responsibility’ constitute an apology or is it simply a clever play with words to say that ‘it’s not my fault but being the magnanimous person I am, I am prepared to be held to account’?

Gordon Brown’s actual words are:

‘I take full responsibility for all my actions, but I think we’re dealing with a bigger problem that is global in nature, as well as national. Perhaps 10 years ago after the Asian crisis when other countries thought these problems would go away, we should have been tougher … keeping and forcing these issues on to the agenda like we did on debt relief and other issues of international policy.’

While looking at from past mistakes is obviously important, it is more important Gordon Brown puts in place the right policies now to get the country out of the current economic slump – something  he seems unfortunately incapable of doing. I’ve no doubt he and will look at this period in ten years time and wish he’d done things differently and not burdened the country with mountainous debt.


FTSE Down to New Low

March 2, 2009

FTSE this morning hit  a new low of 3694.16 which is its lowest level since April 2003. This has been partly triggered by HSBC’s decision to raise £12.5bn from shareholders through a rights issue at a price almost 50% lower than its closing share price last week of 491.25p.

The FTSE 100 index peaked at 6,930.2 at the beginning of 2000 and even as recently as November 2007 was at 6721 points but with the rapid deterioration of the economy it’s value has tumbled. It is yet another sign of the mess the economy is and a damning indictment of Gordon Brown’s handling of the UK economy in the last 12 years.


Sarkozy’s Attack on Brown

February 6, 2009

First the Germans and now the French. There seems to be a queue of politician’s abroad wanting to attack Gordon Brown’s economic policies. No doubt we’ll see Downing Street twist this story to try and explain that this wasn’t aimed at Brown and he is still regarded everywhere as the saviour of the world economy!


Labour’s Sums Don’t Add Up

February 2, 2009